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hello all,

i recently purchased a liquid copper 2017 qx30 from carvana and am still in that seven day test period window. anyhow, i do like the car a lot as it's really nicely optioned. that said, i came across a dealership that was showing off another liquid copper model that had been dropped on eibach lowering springs but i can't seem to find lowering springs for this car/hatchback anywhere. there is one site and this is my first post, so i don't want to link it directly, but it's located at nedautoparts and they sell an eibach lowering springs pro-kit for around 300$ but when i go to eibach's own site, they list only options available for the q60 and the q50.

basically, i want the height of my car closer to the sport variant of the qx60 -- can i buy directly from infiniti using the sport springs specific to that iteration?

i know this site isn't heavily trafficked as there aren't many of these vehicles out there and to top it off, production ended in 2019, but i'm hoping someone will come along to help.

thanks!

oh, and i'm sure i'll have more questions as i get to know the car better!
 

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The QX30 is basically a Mercedes GLA. Suspension parts for the GLA should work on the QX30.

Parts from a QX60 are not going to fit.
 

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The QX30 is basically a Mercedes GLA. Suspension parts for the GLA should work on the QX30.

Parts from a QX60 are not going to fit.
Thanks so much for the tip! I'll look into parts marketed towards owners of that vehicle.

On an unrelated note, because the car is still under factory warranty, I have the option of purchasing an extended warranty through Infiniti. Would you advise that I do so given that this is indeed a Mercedes underneath the beautiful Infiniti sheetmetal? I am trying to weigh the pros and cons of doing so as I typically do purchase extended vehicle service agreements, particularly with Lexus, with whom I've built a strong relationship over the years. The thing is, they're more for peace of mind with Lexus vehicles as they're pretty bulletproof. Nissan/Infiniti products not so much and then adding the layers of Mercedes components woven in probably isn't the best of mixes. What would you guys advise?
 

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My opinion is that extended warranties are always a bad idea. I wouldn't buy a product I didn't have faith would be reliable. If you think it needs the extended warranty, then go buy a different product, imo.

Extended warranties are a massive profit-center for dealers -- that's why they get pushed so hard. Save the cash for a rainy day. Invest, if you can. And pay for repairs when needed, out of pocket.

Nissan certainly builds junk, these days. I wouldn't consider any of the currently-available Infiniti products for purchase. The fact that Mercedes did the engineering and manufacturing of the major components was a big factor in our decision to go with a QX30. I trust Mercedes engineering a lot more than Infiniti, at the corporate level.

That said, our Infiniti dealer has been excellent to work with. It's a shame that Infiniti corporate isn't supporting their dealers with any decent products to sell, these days.
 

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thanks for the advice - sometimes they are a good idea and sometimes they aren't. not often do people want to be stuck in the toyota/lexus, honda/acura bulletproof bubble of reliability. volvo, for example, makes some outstanding looking and performing cars, but would i purchase one without an extended warranty? absolutely not because the stress on that small displacement engine is enormous. that can be said about various components related to various automakers around the world, although within the luxury sphere, the germans are notorious for having trouble as they age and what if one wants to keep the car out of warranty? is the 2000$ extended warranty a bad idea in the case in which the piston rings may fail on x car model manufactured by y marque and require a rebuild? i dunno, that's up to the individual to decide.
 

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volvo, for example, makes some outstanding looking and performing cars, but would i purchase one without an extended warranty? absolutely not because the stress on that small displacement engine is enormous.
That's funny, because I own a 2019 Volvo XC60. It's an absolutely fantastic vehicle. It's been exceptionally reliable -- much more so than my previous Acura MDX. I have much more faith in Volvo than Acura (Honda), at this point. The 2.0L 4 banger puts out 316hp and it's been phenomenal. The Drive-E engine design has been in production since 2013 and aside from some piston ring issues in the first couple years of production (resolved) they've proven to be quite bulletproof. The internals are even over-built for the application. The engine has also made the Wards 10-best list.

the germans are notorious for having trouble as they age and what if one wants to keep the car out of warranty? is the 2000$ extended warranty a bad idea in the case in which the piston rings may fail on x car model manufactured by y marque and require a rebuild? i dunno, that's up to the individual to decide.
I wouldn't keep a BMW or Audi outside of warranty. Actually I wouldn't buy one of those vehicles -- they're built to be leased. And that's a big reason why 70% of new BMWs are leased. You'll see Mercedes vehicles staying on the road a lot longer than the average BMW/Audi. Volvo consistently goes many hundreds of thousands of miles, too.

The extended warranty is designed to make the carrier money. Period. There are actuarials whose sole job is to analyze the numbers and ensure they turn a massive profit on those extended warranties. By definition, making a profit means charging you more than they expect to pay out in claims.
 

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volvo used to go hundreds of thousands of miles. i don't think their current drivetrain using that same 2l turbo and sometimes supercharged as well as electrified powertrain is going to hold up over time. i don't think volvo vehicles are as poorly built as bmws, but i would consider volvos lease-only vehicles as well.
 

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also, yes, i do understand that extended warranties are mostly profitable for dealerships and manufacturers, however, on the rare occasion that i've had to use them with lexus vehicles, they have paid for themselves. for instance, i had the navigation unit totally brick itself and needed a replacement at the cost of 3,200$ - the extended warranty that i had purchased for 2,200$ was an eight year 125k mile warranty and in that case, it paid for itself.

so yeah, generally they are profitable for many car marques, but there are some that i would absolutely not do without if i really wanted to keep the vehicle -- say a bmw m240i, for instance, a car that i absolutely LOVE but i have not purchased because i know it'll be a headache to own.
 

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volvo used to go hundreds of thousands of miles. i don't think their current drivetrain using that same 2l turbo and sometimes supercharged as well as electrified powertrain is going to hold up over time. i don't think volvo vehicles are as poorly built as bmws, but i would consider volvos lease-only vehicles as well.
Entirely your opinion, with seemingly no evidence to support it. Drive-E engines have already been proven over several hundreds of thousands of miles.

The QX30 uses a 2.0L turbocharged engine. More and more cars are moving to that type of design -- some with even smaller engines. Emissions and fuel economy regulations are basically forcing it. Get used to it.
 

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Entirely your opinion, with seemingly no evidence to support it. Drive-E engines have already been proven over several hundreds of thousands of miles.
i own a car with a turbocharged i4, but it's a lexus and those things are over-engineered to the max. i wouldn't trust any marque with any turbocharged, let along turbocharged, supercharged and electrified i4.

i mean, jd power rates the 2019 s60's reliability at 2.5 out of 5. not too encouraging and jd power isn't joe blow mechanic down the street.

anyhow, i don't care to converse over whether or not you're going to have issues with your vehicle. if you do, you'll note that the engine is overstressed given its displacement.

end of discussion as i've gotten what i've needed out of the original question posed's answers and thank you for the information regarding the lowering springs on the mercedes product fitting the infiniti product.
 

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hello all,

i recently purchased a liquid copper 2017 qx30 from carvana and am still in that seven day test period window. anyhow, i do like the car a lot as it's really nicely optioned. that said, i came across a dealership that was showing off another liquid copper model that had been dropped on eibach lowering springs but i can't seem to find lowering springs for this car/hatchback anywhere. there is one site and this is my first post, so i don't want to link it directly, but it's located at nedautoparts and they sell an eibach lowering springs pro-kit for around 300$ but when i go to eibach's own site, they list only options available for the q60 and the q50.

basically, i want the height of my car closer to the sport variant of the qx60 -- can i buy directly from infiniti using the sport springs specific to that iteration?

i know this site isn't heavily trafficked as there aren't many of these vehicles out there and to top it off, production ended in 2019, but i'm hoping someone will come along to help.

thanks!

oh, and i'm sure i'll have more questions as i get to know the car better!
There is a post in the "Still Love the Qx30?" from turboboost12004 about what they used to lower their liquid copper Q.
 
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